Maxwell Elliott

Maxwell Elliott

Student

Biography

Max is a clinical psychology PhD student working with the Moffitt & Caspi lab after completing his BS at the University of Minnesota and spending two years as a research fellow at the National Institute of Mental Health.

Max is interested in further understanding the structure of mental illness through investigating the interacting relationships between genes, environment and the brain. He is particularly interested in finding ways to combine knowledge about genetics and lifespan development with brain imaging to better assess and understand risk factors for mental illness. Through the use of imaging endophenotypes he hopes to further map out relationships between individual differences in health and disease.

In his free time Max loves to get out on his road bike and discover new parts of Durham.

Links

Overview

Max is a clinical psychology PhD student working with Ahmad Hariri and the Moffitt & Caspi lab after completing his BS at the University of Minnesota and spending two years as a research fellow at the National Institute of Mental Health. Max is interested in further understanding the structure of mental illness through investigating the interacting relationships between genes, environment and the brain. He is particularly interested in finding ways to combine knowledge about genetics and lifespan development with brain imaging to better assess and understand risk factors for mental illness. Through the use of imaging endophenotypes he hopes to further map out relationships between individual differences in health and disease.

Selected Grants

Reuben, Aaron, et al. “Association of Childhood Lead Exposure With MRI Measurements of Structural Brain Integrity in Midlife.Jama, vol. 324, no. 19, Nov. 2020, pp. 1970–79. Epmc, doi:10.1001/jama.2020.19998. Full Text

Elliott, Maxwell L. “MRI-based biomarkers of accelerated aging and dementia risk in midlife: how close are we?Ageing Research Reviews, vol. 61, Aug. 2020, p. 101075. Epmc, doi:10.1016/j.arr.2020.101075. Full Text

Rasmussen, Line Jee Hartmann, et al. “Association Between Elevated suPAR, a New Biomarker of Inflammation, and Accelerated Aging.The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, July 2020. Epmc, doi:10.1093/gerona/glaa178. Full Text

Elliott, Maxwell L., et al. “What Is the Test-Retest Reliability of Common Task-Functional MRI Measures? New Empirical Evidence and a Meta-Analysis.Psychological Science, vol. 31, no. 7, July 2020, pp. 792–806. Epmc, doi:10.1177/0956797620916786. Full Text Open Access Copy

Caspi, Avshalom, et al. “Longitudinal Assessment of Mental Health Disorders and Comorbidities Across 4 Decades Among Participants in the Dunedin Birth Cohort Study.Jama Network Open, vol. 3, no. 4, Apr. 2020, p. e203221. Epmc, doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.3221. Full Text

Burr, Daisy A., et al. “Functional connectivity predicts the dispositional use of expressive suppression but not cognitive reappraisal.Brain and Behavior, vol. 10, no. 2, Feb. 2020, p. e01493. Epmc, doi:10.1002/brb3.1493. Full Text Open Access Copy

Reuben, Aaron, et al. “Implications of legacy lead for children's brain development.Nature Medicine, vol. 26, no. 1, Jan. 2020, pp. 23–25. Epmc, doi:10.1038/s41591-019-0731-9. Full Text

Elliott, Maxwell L., et al. “Brain-age in midlife is associated with accelerated biological aging and cognitive decline in a longitudinal birth cohort.Molecular Psychiatry, Dec. 2019. Epmc, doi:10.1038/s41380-019-0626-7. Full Text

Gregory, Michael D., et al. “Williams syndrome hemideletion and LIMK1 variation both affect dorsal stream functional connectivity.Brain : A Journal of Neurology, vol. 142, no. 12, Dec. 2019, pp. 3963–74. Epmc, doi:10.1093/brain/awz323. Full Text

Rasmussen, Line Jee Hartmann, et al. “Association of Neurocognitive and Physical Function With Gait Speed in Midlife.Jama Network Open, vol. 2, no. 10, Oct. 2019, p. e1913123. Epmc, doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.13123. Full Text

Pages

Elliott, Maxwell, et al. A Connectome Wide Functional Signature of Transdiagnostic Risk for Mental Illness. 2017. Epmc, doi:10.1101/196220. Full Text